Carried Off: Abduction, Adoption, and Two Families’ Search for Answers

I’ve written a long feature piece for the Asia Society’s blog ChinaFile about abduction and adoption in China and how it relates to the US. Here’s the first paragraph; you can read the rest here.

In March 2011, Rose Candis had the worst lunch of her life. Sitting at a restaurant in Shaoguan, a small city in South China, the American mother tried hard not to vomit while her traveling companion translated what the man they were eating with had just explained: her adopted Chinese daughter Erica had been purchased, and then essentially resold to her for profit. The papers the Chinese orphanage had shown her documenting how her daughter had been abandoned by the side of a road were fakes. The tin of earth the orphanage had given her so that her daughter could always keep a piece of her home with her as she grew up in the U.S. was a fraud, a pile of dirt from the place her daughter’s paperwork was forged, not where she was born. Candis had flown thousands of miles to answer her daughter Erica’s question—who are my birth parents?—but now she was further from the answer than ever.

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3 thoughts on “Carried Off: Abduction, Adoption, and Two Families’ Search for Answers”

  1. Hi Charlie, if the State Department is giving you bureaucratic doubletalk why they haven’t really considered shutting off the adoption pipeline for China, please do an investigation on the different criteria used on Vietnam’s recent handling of fraudulent orphans (and how the adoption program was shut down there) versus China. Methinks the volume of China adoptions was the real reason why we shut down Vietnam, but not China.

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