The Siege of Wukan, Part IV: Seeds of Siege

(Previously: Part I, Part II, Part III)

Followers of of me on Twitter will be aware that of the two videos I mentioned in Part III of my Wukan coverage, I was able to successfully download one before the links were deleted.

That video is now available in full via my server here. It’s all in Chinese (mostly Cantonese with traditional character subtitles). The file is a 1.1 GB WMV file. You can also download via a mirror here thanks to @ptrebor.

Alternately, I made a shortened, edited version of the video which you can stream here. If you find Youtube loads more smoothly, you can see the video on Youtube here. Additional versions (a version without the music) coming tomorrow.

In other Wukan news, this Chinese news report from late last night indicates that some Wukan officials are being investigated by the Party for misconduct. It’s an indication that the Central government may be planning to side, at least to some extent, with the villagers.

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0 thoughts on “The Siege of Wukan, Part IV: Seeds of Siege”

  1. I think the CCP will apply the standard formula here. They will single out a few of the top and most oorrupt local officials and make an example of them, in order to show that they care about optics and are doing something about it. Then they’ll go medieval on a few of the villagers, in order to show that they care about optics and are doing something about it.

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  2. @C. Custer: Oops, was assuming that “Additional versions (a version without the music) coming tomorrow” was referring to longer versions (I know, assumptions). I’m aware that the WMV is available, but prefer streaming (silly #firstworldproblems I know). Sorry about that.

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  3. I hadn’t heard about Wukan before reading about it on this blog. Maybe my RSS has some defect that I’m not aware of, but I’m following about 20 blogs related to China and nobody paid as much attention to Wukan as Chinageeks. As far as Chinese news is concerned Wukan is what I want to know about right now. The whole world should be watching, but as far as I can tell they’re more interested in Christian Bale. So thanks to Charlie for his work. I wish there were more blogs like this one.

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  4. The “Siege” is over. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/22/world/asia/wukan-china-protesters-agree-to-halt-demonstrations.html?_r=1&hpw I doubt there was a siege in the first place. Water and electricity were never cut off. And the villagers were supplied by neighboring villages. The interesting thing about this protest is the omission in the foreign reporting about the battle on the court. There had to be lawsuits involved, and I have heard nary a word in the U.S. media.

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  5. @ scl: The villagers were supplied with food smuggled in from neighboring villages, yes. But the police weren’t allowing in any supplies that ran into their lines. If that’s not a siege, then what is it?

    As for the lawsuits the US media has been so negligent in not reporting on, perhaps you can enlighten us!

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  6. I guess by cutting off food and supplies but not cutting off water and electricity, the local thugs didn’t quite throw the villagers completely back to medieval times, so maybe it wasn’t a siege in the truly classic sense.

    I too would love to hear about these “lawsuits”. Perhaps we should give out odds of scl actually coming back and backing up those statements.

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